• This Side of Resurrection

      dir. Joaquim Sapinho

      Ines, more concerned with boyfriends and learning how to surf than with God, is disquieted to learn that her brother Rafael has been living as a monk, and not bumming around Australia as she has believed. As Rafael wrestles with his faith, Ines tries to establish a connection.

      Select Festivals:
      Toronto International Film Festival, São Paulo International Film Festival, João Pedro Rodrigues Retrospective

    • Bas-Fonds

      dir. Isild le Besco

      On the outskirts of civilization, three young women, Magalie, Marie-Steph and Barbara live a desperate life together. Drowning in alcohol, they both lust for and hate one another, coupling like animals. Yet gradually they become enmeshed in a complex game of love and domination.

      Select Festivals:
      Locarno International Film Festival (Nominated for Golden Leopard), Oldenburg Film Festival (Nominated for German Independence Audience Award), Film Comments Selects (Opening Night Film)

    • OK, Enough, Goodbye

      dir. Rania Attieh and Daniel Garcia

      In the small, tightly knit city of Tripoli, Lebanon, where family bonds run very deep, a forty-year-old man still lives with his elderly mother and has given up on the idea of becoming independent. But when one day his mother suddenly leaves him, the man is left with nothing but the company of the small city and what it offers.

      Select Festivals:
      Abu Dhabi Film Festival (Best New Director from the Arab World), Philadelphia Film Festival (Special Jury Prize for Narrative Feature), BAFICI (Cinema of the Future Award), Vancouver International Film Festival, Hamptons Film Festival, Thessaloniki Film Festival

    • Exit Elena

      dir. Nathan Silver

      With no place to call home, 19-year-old Elena takes a job as a live-in aide. She finds herself thrust into the middle of a family in crisis: all the things that go on between a father, grandmother, mother, and cat. Eventually, Elena strikes something of a balance though... That is, until the prodigal son returns home. Placing fictional characters alongside real people, Exit Elena is shot through with all the rough edges inherent to family life and home movie form – in short, it’s a dark comedy.

      Select Festivals:
      Edinburgh International Film Festival, Viennale, BAFICI, IndieLisboa, IFFBoston, Cucalorus, Vancouver International Film Festival, Woodstock Film Festival (Received Honorable Mention)

    • The Invader

      dir. Nicolas Provost

      An illegal African worker in Belgium, Amadou works in construction for an underworld boss in order to support himself and his sick friend. But when his friend suddenly "disappears," Amadou strikes out on his own. By chance, he spies on a conversation between his boss and Agnes, an attractive businesswoman. Agnes seems to have everything Amadou's looking for: beauty, style, wealth, and connections. He follows her about the city, eventually manufacturing a pretense to strike up a conversation. Agnes is not adverse to this charismatic stranger's advances, but she wants no more than a quick fling. As their romance grows cold, Amadou begins a dangerous descent into violence and madness.

      Select Festivals:
      Venice International Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Hamburg Film Festival, AFI Film Festival, Ghent Film Festival (Best Actor), Seattle Film Festival (Grand Jury Prize for Best New Director); Flemish Film Awards: Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Music, Best Costume Design, Film Industry Award

    • North From Calabria

      dir. Marcin Sauter

      North From Calabria is about an idyll, where life is easy and people know each other, tolerate their faults, like to meet to talk and just be together. For one summer, a film crew mingles with the inhabitants of the small Polish town of Chełmsko Slaskie to an enact an "almost" Italian comedy. It turns out all the locals needed was a few lessons on Italian cuisine and a reminder of the art of carpe diem to transform their rural Eastern Europe village into a stand-in for Southern Italy. A documentarian's midsummer night's dream.

      Select Festivals:
      Kraków Film Festival, Zamość Poland Summer Film Festival (Best Documentary Film), True/False Film Festival, Thessaloniki Film Festival

    • A Lake

      dir. Philippe Grandrieux

      An unknown place, a land of snow and of forests, far in the North. A single family lives isolated in a house next to a lake. Alexi, the son, is a young man with a pure heart, a wood cutter. Beset by epileptic fits and and an ecstatic nature, he is one with the nature that surrounds him. With his sister, their blind mother, their father and their youngest brother, the family observes in silence an intense love. And then a stranger arrives, a pained young man who is older than Alexi...

      Select Festivals:
      Venice International Film Festival (Special Mention for Pioneering New Cinematic Trends), Mar del Plata Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival, Gent International Film Festival, AFI Film Festival

      "Confirms Grandrieux as a true original, up there somewhere the filmmakers like Bela Tarr." - Derek Elley, Variety

      "Astonishing, almost unbearably passionate." - Conall Cash, Screener

    • The Fire

      dir. Brigitte Maria Bertele

      After an evening out, the 35-year-old, self-confident Judith is raped on her way home. She fights with all possible means to prevent her life being changed. Her lawyer advises her to press charges. But destructive consequences force their way into her life. When the perpetrator's false statement causes her hopes of legal redress to collapse, Judith looks for another way to get justice and it almost looks like she is out for revenge. But Judith is pursuing an unusual, radical path to prove the criminal's guilt.

      Select Festivals:
      Max Ophüls Festival, Montréal World Film Festival (Best Director), Oldenburg International Film Festival (Best Actress), Thessaloniki International Film Festival, Paris German Film Festival

      "Bertele's competent direction... is distinguished mainly by its cool restraint, counterpointing the paranoia and rage of the film's increasingly obsessed heroine whose quest for justice transforms into a thirst for revenge." - Ronnie Scheib, Variety

      "Viewers will likely feel just as helpless and uneasy as [the heroine's] achingly supportive boyfriend does." - Laura Kern, Film Comment

    • Extraordinary Stories

      dir. Mariano Llinás

      "X" witnesses a murder in the countryside and flees, fearing for his life, but soon realizes he doesn't know who he is running from. "Z" finds his new job immeasurably dull, yet is soon compelled to investigate the life of his predecessor, discovering a web of secret identities, illicit funds, and nefarious trade. "H" is contracted to navigate a river photographing stone monoliths, seemingly the easiest money he will ever make, until he comes face to face with a man hired to destroy them. These three stories form the basis for the circuitous narrative that takes us around the globe, through the lives of farmers, bureaucrats, jailers, architects, and more, and gamely explores the mammoth question of "where is the truth in any story?"

      Select Festivals:
      Buenos Aires Film Festival (Special Jury Prize, Audience Award), Turin Film Festival, Cinequest Film Festival, Miami International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, Vancouver International Film Festival

      "At once instantly accessible and like nothing I've ever seen before." - Paul Brunick, The New York Times

      "A source of... exquisite pleasures." - Andrew Schenker, Slant Magazine

    • A Fallible Girl

      dir. Conrad Clark

      Lifei, a Chinese woman in Dubai, struggles to gain financial independence through a small mushroom farm in the middle of the desert. A layered and atypical portrait of an increasingly globalized world, the film was shot on location in Dubai, features two Chinese leads, a British director, and dialogue in a mixture of Arabic, Mandarin, and English.

      Select Festivals:
      International Film Festival Rotterdam, Bradford International Film Festival, Gulf film Festival

      "Before the final credits, the feeling that seizes the spectator is one of sadness and melancholia."
      - Cristina Álvarez López, De Film Krant

      “Visually impressive... purifying.”
      - 2013 International Film Festival Rotterdam

    • Leones

      dir. Jazmín López

      Deep in the forest a group of five friends wander around like a lion herd. Lost in their word games, they play and seduce each other while going back and forth into adulthood territory, in a desperate search to avoid their already written story.

      Select Festivals:
      Venice Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, New Directors/New Films, Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Cinema, Thessaloniki International Film Festival

      "[Director Jazmín] López's study of time and spirituality transcends conventional narrative filmmaking to good, if not stellar effect."
      - Patrick Gamble, CineVue

      "Leones is one of the most demanding films of the festival so far because of the attractive mystery it bestows, not wholly confined to an opaque narrative, but referentially bonded with a method of filmmaking that holds considerable implications."
      - Ed Doyle, Sound on Sight

    • To The Wolf

      dir. Aran Hughes and Christina Koutsospyrou

      The hybrid narrative/documentary follows an aging population living in a decaying village in the mountains of Greece far from the wonders of Athens, and its struggles due to the economic follies of the country.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlinale, Thessaloniki Documentary Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Docslisboa, Viennale, Torino Film Festival

      "A visionary, crafted gem of nonfiction."
      - Ray Pride, Filmmaker Magazine

      “One of the standouts” at the Toronto International Film Festival.
      - Adam Nayman, Cinema Scope

    • Soft in the Head

      dir. Nathan Silver

      Thrown out of her New York City apartment, Natalia, a 25-year-old hot mess, relies on the kindness of friends and strangers. Seemingly unaware of the havoc she wreaks, she skips from one place to another, including her best friend's, where she crashes a holiday meal and seduces the best friend's socially inept brother. Natalia ends up staying at a shelter run by genuinely good Maury, who takes an interest in making her life better -- but life is not that simple, and tragedy ensues. With a menagerie of New York characters, set against the backdrop of a homeless shelter, a religious household, and the cacophonous streets of New York, SOFT IN THE HEAD is a look at how easy it is to lose one’s head in the big city, particularly for those already lost.

      Select Festivals:
      Sarasota Film Festival, BAFICI, Viennale, Vancouver International Film Festival, Göteborg International Film Festival, Brooklyn Film Festival (Winner: Best Actress), Dallas VideoFest (Winner: Best Narrative Feature

      "Nathan Silver's raucous, disturbing new film is a shrewdly conceived yet emotionally unhinged blend of uproarious situations and devastating outcomes."
      - The New Yorker

      "...the audience must sink or swim. The sensation is at once maddening and, for its daredevil embrace of naturalism, absolutely thrilling."
      - Steve Dollar, The Wall Street Journal

      "John Cassavetes-like slice of lowlife."
      - Peter Keough, Boston Globe

    • The International Sign for Choking

      dir. Zach Weintraub

      A would-be expatriate from the US takes his second stab at life in Buenos Aires. Watch as he drifts between halfhearted attempts at work, a feeble romance with his fellow North American housemate, and the fruitless search for a mysteriously absent ex-girlfriend.

      Select Festivals:
      BAFICI, IndieLisboa, BAMcinemaFest, Maryland Film Festival, AFI Fest, SF IndieFest, Torino Film Festival

      "Weintraub has made something of a hipster Ozu film out of his fleecy material, and as with Ozu, the theme of loss is paramount.”
      - Robert Kohler, Variety

      “An experience in alternative narrative filmmaking, with incredible emotional depth that goes nearly unnoticed until the final moments.”
      - Kathryn Schroeder, Film Fracture

      "The film upends expectations at every turn, from the defiantly nontouristic views of Buenos Aires to the tough, unsparing conclusions the story reaches about its adrift protagonist.”
      - Keith Uhlich, Time Out New York

    • The Temptation of St. Tony

      dir. Veiko Õunpuu

      Tony, a middle-aged, midlevel manager, leads a quiet life. But one day, he starts to question the value of being good. In a series of bizarre encounters, Tony gradually becomes unhinged from reality.

      Select Festivals:
      Sundance Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, BAMcinématek, Hong Kong International Film Festival, Karlovy Vary Film Festival, London Film Festival, Tokyo International Film Festival

      "[Director] Veiko Õunpuu has weaved an existential rumination on Eastern European temporality, where work is waiting and waiting is work, and a visually stunning critique of the exacerbation of difference that post-communist times have to offer."
      - Diego Costa, Slant Magazine

      "The black-and-silver photography is like fine-edged engraving; Õunpuu is one of the few directors featured who seems to take making a film as an "Astonish me" challenge."
      - Nick Pinketon, Village Voice

      "Bizarre and beautiful, disturbing and droll."
      - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

    • Nothing Personal

      dir. Urszula Antoniak

      A young travelling woman and a older educated, solitary man close a deal: food in exchange of work. But there is one condition: no personal contact, no questions. Who will be the first one to break the deal?

      Select Festivals:
      Locarno Film Festival, Warsaw Film Festival, Thessaloniki International Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Dublin Film Festival, Miami Film Festival

      "We've forgotten the power of measured and calculated quiet, or how unsettling its presence can be, a sensation [director Urszula] Antoniak understands and exploits."
      - Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times

      "The cinematographer... envelops [the characters] in a world of extraordinary sensuality." (Critics' Pick)
      - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

      “The whole thing is a pleasure to watch... because [Lotte] Verbeek and [Stephen] Rea telegraph volumes of subtext beneath the dialogue they’re given.”
      - Ernest Hardy, Village Voice

    • Himizu

      dir. Sion Sono

      Following the Japanese earthquake and tsunami, a 15-year-old boy abandoned by his family desires normalcy but is driven to violence. Meanwhile, a classmate openly obsessed with him makes it her mission to bring him back to the righteous path. Is it possible for either of them to find hope in an increasingly bleak world?

      Select Festivals:
      Venice Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Pusan International Film Festival, Oslo International Film Festival, Deauville Asian Film Festival

      "[Director Sion Sono] has captured not only staggering images that exemplify our tumbledown world but what may become one of the great themes of our time: how the young will bear the yoke of elders who've been wiped out... by recent events."
      - Mike McCahill, The Guardian

      "Young leads Shota Sometani and Fumi Nikaidou – both experienced film actors – grow in stature as the film progresses to the achingly real final scene."
      - Deborah Young, Hollywood Reporter

      "Himizu finds a... hard-won feeling of hope."
      - Kenji Fujishima, Slant Magazine

    • Me Too

      dir. Antonio Naharro and Álvaro Pastor

      Daniel meets Laura. She’s attractive, rebellious, and a little trampy. They hang out, have fun together, and he falls hard for her. The unexpected part is that 34-year-old Daniel has Down syndrome. While Daniel is definitely extraordinary—a college graduate who holds sophisticated conversations—he still has to deal with others’ perceptions of him. As Daniel and Laura grow closer, their emotions take them into unfamiliar territory.

      Select Festivals:
      Sundance Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Seattle International Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Vancouver International Film Festival

      "Sensitive without being unrealistically utopian (this isn’t a fairy tale), “Me, Too” movingly represents the frustration of the high-functioning yet falling-short individual."
      - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

      "[Directors Álvaro] Pastor and [Antonio] Naharro have written a great part for [Lola] Dueñas and direct her with great care. In fact, her delicately nuanced portrayal is crucial to why this lovely film works so well. "
      - Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times

      "The film powerfully hits the note of universalism that is its goal."
      - Ernest Hardy, Village Voice

    • Starfish Hotel

      dir. John Williams

      Strange things always happen in Jo Kuroda's mystery novels. There is always a sinister rabbit called Mr Trickster; and someone always ends up dead. A man's wife disappears and he finds her working in a brothel deep in the heart of the city. There is a universe called the Darkland that can only be entered through a hidden tunnel. There is a young girl that the man had an affair with in the dead of winter, two years ago. She would only meet him in the eerie, crumbling Starfish Hotel. Now she's disappeared too. If you meet Jo Kuroda one night, don't tell him your dreams.

      Select Festivals:
      Seattle International Film Festival, Sydney Film Festival, Luxembourg International Film Festival, Brussels International Festival of Fantastic Film

      "...more than the sum of its mysterioso atmospherics. Williams is after bigger game, just as “Alice in Wonderland,” one of his inspirations, is not only a tale for children, but also an adult meditation on the strangeness and madness of the world."
      - Mark Schilling, The Japan Times

      "Its visuals are rich and static, its soundtrack a decadent pleasure bordering on discordant, and like all good allegories, the picture it paints has meaning beyond the images used to depict it."
      - Deni, Heroic Cinema

    • Late Bloomers

      dir. Julie Gavras

      In this romantic comedy, Mary and Adam aren’t your typical older couple, they’re high functioning and stylish and to their great surprise, they’ve entered the senior category. Adam is in frantic denial, desperately looking for the fountain of youth as Mary decides to deal with the situation by doing what she does best, taking care of her husband and family. After 30 years together, the married couple confronts the unpalatable realities of getting older and concludes that emotional absence is the easiest way to cope.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin International Film Festival, Calgary International Film Festival, Brussels Film Festival, Cabourg Film Festival

      "Without even trying to be profound, the film communicates a great deal of truth."
      - Roger Ebert, RoberEbert.com

      "It’s a pleasure to see Hurt and Rossellini work together and apart as a couple who still have a spark."
      - Alison Willmore, AV Club

    • Yumurta

      dir. Semih Kaplanoglu

      A poet, Yusuf, after learning of his mother's death, returns to his childhood hometown, which he hasn't visited for years. A young girl, Ayla awaits him in a crumbling house. Yusuf has been unaware of the existence of this distant relation who had been living with his mother for five years. She informs him, despite his desire to return to Istanbul, he must perform a sacrifice his mother has been prevented by death from fulfilling.

      Select Festivals:
      Cannes Film Festival, Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, Thessaoloniki International Film Festival, Trieste Film Festival, Milano Film Festival

      "[The protagonist Yusuf is on] a journey that, captured with compassion, humaneness, and melancholy by [director Semih] Kaplanoglu and company's frequently ravishing, deliberately paced view of it, is a thing of compassionate, melancholy beauty."
      - Christopher McQuain, DVD Talk

      "This film is a wonderful, sensitive, realistic and poetic return to one's past."
      - Mavi Boncuk Turkish Cinema Newsletter

    • Süt

      dir. Semih Kaplanoglu

      Recent high school graduate Yusuf is uncertain about his future in the provincial countryside. Writing poetry is his greatest passion and some of his poems are starting to be published in obscure literary journals. But for the time being, he continues working in his single mother's village milk business, also with an uncertain future. Can he survive on poetry and working alongside his mother in her small-time milk business? Or will he be forced to move to the big city or seek a job in one of the many factories threatening the unspoiled landscape?

      Select Festivals:
      Venice Film Festival, Istanbul International Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival, London Turkish Film Festival

      "[Director Semih] Kaplanoglu’s cinema is just that—beads of intriguing shots and sequences that could make an interesting necklace only if the viewer chooses to string them together."
      - Jugu Abraham, Movies Sans Frontieres

      "Süt is ultimately a sensitive, visually gorgeous (as usual for Kaplanoglu) delve into the troubled dreams and dissatisfying yet wide-open, unpredictable reality of our ever-conflicted protagonist's post-teen transitional limbo, the shaky bridge between his relatively uncomplicated childhood and his free, successful, but alienated adulthood."
      - Christopher McQuain, DVD Talk

    • Bal

      dir. Semih Kaplanoglu

      Yusuf's best friend is his father, who supports his family's modest life with the honey he collects from tall trees in the forests of the remote Turkish countryside. Yusuf is a quiet boy, and his mother is concerned for his future. Perhaps he will follow in his father's footsteps, or perhaps school will offer him other opportunities.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin International Film Festival, Sydney Film Festival, Karlovy Vary Film Festival, Melbourne International Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival

      "Like the viewer, Mr. Kaplanoglu is quite happy to let nature do the talking and cast a lyrical, mysterious spell."
      - Andy Webster, The New York Times

      "Bal mingles the bitter and the sweet."
      - Sam Adams, AV Club

    • Summer Pasture

      dir. Lynn True, Nelson Walker, and Tsering Perlo

      The story of a family at a crossroads, Summer Pasture takes place at a critical time in Locho and Yama's lives, as they question their future as nomads. With their pastoral traditions confronting rapid modernization, Locho and Yama must reconcile the challenges that threaten to drastically reshape their existence.

      Select Festivals:
      Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Tokyo International Film Festival, Museum of Modern Art, IDA DocuWeeks, Big Sky Documentary Film Festival

      "Summer Pasture is remarkable not merely for documenting the disappearing way of life, but for registering the depth of Yama and Locho's uncertainty about moving on from it."
      - Benjamin Mercer, Village Voice

      "Has an earthy intimacy and compassion for its subjects that will have you thinking about their plight long after they've packed up and moved on for winter."
      - Robert Abele, Los Angeles Times

      "So while the film has the plaintive spirit of a humanitarian portrait, directors Lynn True, Nelson Walker, and Tsering Perlo have more valuably developed a time capsule of rural Asian idiosyncrasy."
      - Joseph Jon Lanthier, Slant Magazine

    • Sado Tempest

      dir. John Williams

      Sado Tempest is a radical retelling of Shakespeare's 'Tempest', fusing Noh theatre, Taiko drumming and Japanese rock. Japan, the near future; rebel rock star, Jun Tokushima is exiled to the bleak prison island of Sado, which has fallen into permanent winter after a terrible storm. At first he tries to escape, but there is no way off the island. His only hope seems to lie in the strange, ancient songs of the Demons that once lived there, but the Demons have all disappeared. Jun has to break the code of the songs, and free the Demons, in order to bring Spring back into the world.

      Select Festivals:
      Raindance International Film Festival, Brooklyn Film Festival, Camera Japan Festival, Montreal Festival du Nouveau Cinema

      "...a fantastic voyage beyond cultures and eras to strange islands in the subconscious we seldom visit save in dreams."
      - Mark Schilling, The Japan Times

      "A fascinating example of hybrid filmmaking, Sado Tempest is at once the product of wildly diverse roots and a homogenously original creation."
      - Tom Mes, Midnight Eye

    • Die Welt

      dir. Alex Pitstra

      We follow Abdallah, a young DVD salesman from Tunis, who dreams of a better life in Europe, or in Die Welt, as his father calls the other side of the Mediterranean. The film is based on Pitstra’s own observations in Tunisia, his father’s country, which was unfamiliar to him for the first 25 years of his life. With fresh cinematic audacity and convincing performances, including a role played by his own father, Pitstra paints an immersive picture of daily life in post-revolutionary Tunisia.

      Select Festivals:
      International Film Festival Rotterdam, New Directors/New Films, Seattle International Film Festival, Edinburgy International Film Festival, Doha Tribeca Film Festival

      "Alex Pitstra intermingles documentary and fiction as impressively as he does the seemingly incongruous worlds of Tunisia and Holland that form his identity."
      - Kevin Lee, IndieWire

      "Die Welt is a lively and intelligent exploration of the conflicted emotions felt by contemporary Arab youth towards the West."
      - Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter

    • When We Leave

      dir. Feo Aladag

      German-born Umay flees her oppressive marriage in Istanbul, taking her young son Cem with her. She hopes to find a better life with her family in Berlin, but her unexpected arrival creates intense conflict. Her family is trapped in their conventions, torn between their love for her and the traditional values of their community.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin International Film Festival, Istanbul Film Festival, Tribeca Film Festival, Seattle International Film Festival, Moscow Film Festival, Venice Film Festival

      "[Sibel] Kekilli...makes for a magnetic focal point, and the story of Umay’s rebellion builds toward an almost unbearable tension."
      - Andrew O'Hehir, Salon

      "When We Leave is a film without villains. Instead, it features a set of circumstances that inevitably and needlessly spin out of control. B-Plus."
      - Scott Tobias, AV Club

    • Letters to Father Jacob

      dir. Klaush Härö

      With few options, newly pardoned convict Leila agrees to work as an assistant to a blind pastor. Father Jacob spends his days answering the letters of the needy, which Leila finds pointless. But when the letters stop, the pastor is devastated and Leila finds herself cast in a new role.

      Select Festivals:
      Gothenburg Film Festival, Vancouver International Film Festival, Pusan International Film Festival, Santa Barbara International Film Festival, Seattle International Film Festival

      "Letters to Father Jacob serves as a stirring example of just what can be accomplished in a mere 74 minutes."
      - Michael Rechtshaffen, The Hollywood Reporter

      "Both leads provide remarkable, exquisitely calibrated performances."
      - Alissa Simon, Variety

    • R

      dir. Tobias Lindholm and Michael Noer

      The prisoner R arrives to Denmark’s toughest prison, where he is to serve a sentence for violent assault. R is reduced to a number, a letter, just another inmate. The prison is a parallel world filled with rules, honor, and debts. A world, in which bars cover the windows and blood stains the floor. R is placed in the most hardcore ward. Here he must find his place in the system, learn to navigate, and fight for survival. navigate, and fight for survival.

      Select Festivals:
      International Film Festival Rotterdam, Gothenburg International Film Festival, BAM Cinematek, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, Montreal World Film Festival

      "There's a palpable desperation to each sequence, and Noer and Lindholm's fluid handheld camera haunts these men through the dank interiors and gloomy prison yard, sometimes holding on them for long takes that seem to capture an entire experience in a matter of minutes."
      - Glenn Heath, Jr, Slant Magazine

      "Directors-screenwriters Lindholm and Noer are careful not to let the audience know more than their protagonist does, keeping them in the nerve-wrecking state of uncertainty and fear."
      - Karsten Kastelan, Hollywood Reporter

    • Ocaso

      dir. Théo Court

      Rafael, an old butler of a decadent farmhouse, lives with his landlord in that space. He develops a series of actions and daily routines that resume a life and a glorious family past. These actions and gestures will become the only way of sustaining that home and those lives humbled in memory. With the decline of that environment, Rafael will be underdog of his place and his own story, and will be forced to leave in an uncertain trip, towards the last of his possessions.

      Select Festivals:
      International Film Festival Rotterdam, BAFICI, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria International Film Festival, Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival

      "The gradual fade-out of an old man’s existence — and a way of life — unfolds with exquisite beauty..."
      - Robert Koehler, Variety

    • Days of Gray

      dir. Ani Simon-Kennedy

      It is a world without language. A world where one is raised to respect the rules. Every possession is strictly utilitarian. All must wear masks when venturing from home. Men must protect society from outsiders who do not follow the rules. Faith is dead. Hope is dead. Joy is dead. Only one boy questions the verity of what he has been taught. He scavenges for lost objects from distant times, he shares warmth with his younger Sister, and he dares to befriend an outsider - the Girl. The Boy knows it is only a matter of time before he must become a hunter like his father, eliminating outsiders. He must decide whether to continue living in a society of fear or choose his own destiny.

      Select Festivals:
      Reykjavík International Film Festival, Göteberg International Film Festival, Two Riversides Art + Film Festival, Kaunas International Film Festival, Nordic Film Festival, New Filmmakers New York

      "While its fable-like simplicity makes it a specialty item in commercial terms, it represents an assured debut that should attract attention on the fest circuit and could connect with musical tastemakers."
      - John Defore, The Hollywood Reporter

      "The film concerns the rituals and tensions of one particular homestead... It all feels universal, and crucially, exportable."
      - Mark Asch, Keyframe

    • Buoy

      dir. Steve Doughton

      A married mother of two, unexpectedly pregnant with her third child, answers the phone to hear a voice from her distant past. Against the backdrop of various subjects - his narrow escape from a sinking fishing vessel, her deep loneliness as a parent, their shared and complicated history - the 80-minute conversation reveals the deeper stories of their selves, at the same time it explores universal questions: What does it mean to be a good person and to live your life well? How do you keep your disappointment in—and envy for—another person's life choices from standing in the way of your love for her or him? Is it possible to forgive betrayals of the past as you commit one in the present?

      Select Festivals:
      Queensworld Film Festival (Winner of Best Actor - Female - Feature), BendFilm Festival (Winner of Best Screenplay Award), Northwest Filmmakers' Festival (Winner of Audience Favorite Narrative Feature Award), Lone Star Film Festival, Ashland Independent Film Festival

      "A bold but never showy bit of innovative filmmaking"
      - Marc Mohan, The Oregonian

      "Unexpectedly compelling... [Steve Doughton]'s understated formalism nicely balances roller-coaster emotions."
      - Tom Keogh, Seattle Times

    • My Brother the Devil

      dir. Sally El Hosaini

      Mo is a young boy growing up in a traditional Egyptian household, but beyond the front door of the family's modest London flat is a completely different world - the streets of Hackney. The impressionable Mo idolizes his handsome older brother Rashid and wants to follow is his footsteps. However, Rashid, a charismatic and shrewd member of a local gang, wants a different life for his little brother and deals drugs hoping to put Mo through college. One eventful summer, Rashid's sexual awakening forces Mo to confront his own fears and phobias and threatens to tear the brothers apart.

      Select Festivals:
      Sundance Film Festival, Berlin International Film Festival, Rio de Janeiro International Film Festival, Warsaw Film Festival, Stockholm International Film Festival

      "A film that so artfully refuses to surrender to convention."
      - John Anderson, Variety

      "My Brother the Devil... is a tender, bracing fraternal drama of London's gang life, the immigrant experience, and questions no smaller than what 'manhood' might mean."
      - Alan Scherstuhl, Village Voice

    • Ivan & Ivana

      dir. Jeff Daniel Silva

      After the Kosovo war devastates a young couple's homeland and their dreams for a normal life, they set out unexpectedly from the Balkans, along a wild journey to rebuild their lives anew in America. Arriving in California amidst the peak of a housing boom that would soon burst, the film reveals their trials and tribulations over five years of turbulent economic, political and personal tides to reveal an unorthodox depiction of the American immigrant experience.

      Select Festivals:
      Visions du Reel, Independent Film Festival Boston, Viennale, Documentary Fortnight at Museum of Modern Art, Human Rights Arts & Film Festival

      "The titular subjects display an amazing openness toward helmer Jeff Silva and toward the camera as witness, granting viewers an unfiltered look at the U.S. economic meltdown...Silva's docu warrants limited theatrical release."
      - Ronnie Scheib, Variety

      "‎Silva skillfully conveys seismic shifts in Ivan and Ivana's relationship through the subtlest of touches."
      - Victoria Large, Not Coming to a Theater Near You

    • Tiger Tail in Blue

      dir. Frank V. Ross

      Tiger Tail in Blue is about a young married couple, Christopher & Melody, that work opposite schedules to remain financially afloat as Chris bangs out his first novel while working nights as a waiter. Never seeing each other is taking its toll, as the two rarely get a chance to engage one another. Chris finds the attention he craves in the past and Brandy, a saucy co-worker.

      Select Festivals:
      Cork International Film Festival, Melbourne International Film Festival, Rooftop Films Screening Series, Wisconsin Film Festival, Reynolda Film Festival, Best Film Not Playing at a Theater Near You MOMA Screening Series

      "Some moviegoers still cherish the chance to experience the work of new and intriguing voices who don't follow the established rules of commercial cinema. For those hardy people, "Tiger Tail in Blue" is worth seeking out."
      - Peter Sobczynski, RogerEbert.com

      "The film is a measured look at working class married life that dares to remain true to life’s actual, mundane reality. It is within that formal commitment that we find truth and revelation; the question of what we do with that knowledge is left for us to answer."
      - Mike S. Ryan, Hammer to Nail

    • You Make Me Feel So Young

      dir. Zach Weintraub

      A black and white movie about grey areas. Justine moves to a small town with her boyfriend on account of his new job. Quick kisses and repetitive manual tasks ensue.

      Select Festivals:
      Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Cinema, New Orleans Film Festival, Olympia Film Festival

      "a stark and elliptical portrait of an ailing relationship between a young couple, that succeeds in turning microscopic shifts in behaviour into something of great cumulative power."
      - Ian Barr, The Brag

      "Everyday concerns are both the parts and the whole. The fleeting beauty and frequent boredom of small town, small time life are the plot points."
      - Brandon Harris, The New Inquiry

    • The Destiny of Lesser Animals

      dir. Deron Albright

      A dream deferred... a future never dreamed of. The Destiny of Lesser Animals follows Boniface Koomsin, a Ghanaian police inspector, as he embarks upon a dangerous crime-laden journey to recover the one thing that can help him realize his ultimate dream— to escape the ghosts of his past and return to America.

      Select Festivals:
      Chicago International Film Festival, Starz Denver Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, New Directors New Films, Seattle International Film Festival, Philadelphia Film Festival

      "Albright’s keen direction, along with Nunoo’s impressive acting, make for a compelling drama."
      - Clinton Stark, The Stark Insider

      "A ‎Ghanaian crime thriller that goes beyond the genre to become a work of art."
      - Eric Shlapack, Examiner.com

    • Boy Eating the Bird's Food

      dir. Ektoras Lygizos

      Following his will to survive while retaining his dignity and keeping his canary alive, the whole time fighting his hunger, 23-year-old Yorgos wanders the streets of Athens. The camera will follow him closely, sensing his power, his despair, his pride, and his essence, but without attempting to explain his actions, his motives or his situation. Besides, there’s no need to. Through its pared down, ascetic style, the film reveals the deepest facets of the hero’s existence, and, along with it, a painfully accurate picture of modern-day Greece, in a heart-rending yet inspiring film, that cannot help but strike a chord in us all.

      Select Festivals:
      Toronto International Film Festival, Reykjavik International Film Festival, BFI London Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival

      "...a cinematic cri de coeur from a nation in physically and psychologically dire straits."
      - Boyd van Hoeij, Variety

      "The spectre of the current Greek economic crisis looms large in this astonishing first feature that sees realism and allegory sit side-by-side."
      - Laurence Boyce, Cineuropa

    • The Girl

      dir. Fredrik Edfeldt

      In the summer of 1981, a 9-year old girl is left behind in her aunt’s care while the rest of her family goes to Africa as aid workers. The aunt is soon courted by a man and leaves the girl with the promise to return in a few days. The abandoned girl keeps this a secret from everyone and uses her freedom to discover the world around her as the summer passes by. With sharpening senses she gradually discovers the often absurd and careless world of adults.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin Film Festival, Athens International Film Festival, Helsinki International Film Festival, Montreal Festival du Nouveau Cinema

      "...delivers a satisfying, sun-dappled fable about the kindness of strangers and the cruelty of peers."
      - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

      "Fredrik Edfeldt is a master at externalizing interiority without spoiling it. His camera is unabashed yet respectful of the delicateness of its subject."
      - Diego Costa, Slant

    • Oxygen

      dir. Hans Van Nuffel

      Suffering from an illness that is slowly destroying his lungs, Tom struggles with his short life expectancy and hangs out with petty criminals. Enter his hospital neighbour Xavier who suffers from the same illness but behaves like an athlete and infuses Tom with optimism. Tom enjoys his new friend and finds love with quirky quarantine girl Eline. But when Tom’s brother dies during a lung transplant, he is devastated and breaks away from Xavier and Eline. Much later, Tom and Xavier meet again when they are both up for a lung transplant. Slowly, their friendship rekindles...

      Select Festivals:
      Rome International Film Festival, Festival des Films du Monde Montréal, Seville European Film Festival, Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival

      "Underplaying the expected tears and inspirational uplift, Oxygène skirts disease-of-the-week cliche to deliver a touching portrait of youth facing mortality far too soon."
      - Dennis Harvey, Variety

      "...an impressively made tale about two young men trying to embrace life despite illness dragging them down. It is touching, harrowing and even gently romantic at times..."
      - Mark Adams, Screen Daily

    • The Hunter

      dir. Rafi Pitts

      In an act of vengeance, a young man, randomly kills two police officers. He escapes to the forest, where he is arrested by two other officers. The three men are surrounded by trees, the woods. They are lost in a maze, a desolate landscape, where the boundaries between the hunter and the hunted are difficult to perceive.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin Film Festival, Seattle International Film Festival, Palm Springs Film Festival, Iranian Film Festival Australia

      "...Manages an atmosphere of choked, ambiguous dread, somehow naturalistic and hallucinatory at once, that recalls nothing less than Godard's Alphaville."
      - Chuck Bowen, Slant

      "...Seeps under your skin as you wait for its grim, taciturn protagonist to detonate."
      - Stephen Holden, Screen Daily

    • Good to Go

      dir. Matevz Luzar

      Ivan is a retired music teacher in his late 70s, and has grown weary of life. He buys himself a plot in a graveyard with an unrivalled view of the Alps and checks into a retirement home, so he can wait for his death in peace. However, the exact opposite happens: at computer classes, he discovers his joie-de-vivre and finally starts to live.

      Select Festivals:
      Slovenian Film Festival, Pula International Film Festival, LET’S CEE Film Festival, Prishtina International Film Festival, Mumbai Film Festival

      "Good to Go is an uncommon and intensely successful debut film..."
      - Ronny Dombrowski, Cinetastic

      "A bittersweet monument..."
      - Gorazd Trušnovec, Ekran

    • Crawl

      dir. Hervé Lasgouttes

      Crawl tells the emerging romance between Martin, a Young man living on casual jobs and small robberies, and Gwen a dedicated swimmer who trains everyday in high-sea. Their lives changed when she gets pregnant and he is charged with murder.

      Select Festivals:
      Venice Days, International Film Festival Bratislava, Panorama of European Cinema, Palm Springs International Film Festival, Göteborg International Film Festival, Rendez-vous du cinéma français

      "Debuting director Hervé Lasgouttes uses the chilly setting to potent effect, and his eye for local detail and compassion for his characters ground the film ..."
      - Sheri Linden, Hollywood Reporter

      "Director Hervé Lasgouttes exhibits a real talent for achieving the look, sound and feel of a particular environment and the type of community that inhabits it."
      - Laura Clifford, Reeling Reviews

    • Myn Bala

      dir. Akan Satayev

      In 1729 Kazakhstan, a ferocious Mongol tribe sweeps across the Steppes. A young man named Sartai assembles a detachment of young warriors and leads them into battle to free his country from decades of terror.

      Select Festivals:
      Cannes Film Festival, Doha Tribeca Film Festival, Montreal Film Festival, Eurasia International Film Festival

      "...Set to do for Kazakhstan what Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon did for China: take its films out of the arthouse and into the mainstream."
      - Nick Roddick, The London Evening Standard

      "Kazakhstan’s official entry in the best foreign-language Oscar race is a sabre-rattling, chest-beating, flag-waving celebration of a mythic warrior hero from the early 18th century."
      - Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter

     
     

    Vyer Films Catalogue

    Stop browsing. See something new.
    Vyer Films brings the best underseen films from the festival circuit directly to audiences without the time or ability to see films of quality. Learn more about Vyer Films.

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    • This Side of Resurrection

      This Side of Resurrection

      dir. Joaquim Sapinho

      Ines, more concerned with boyfriends and learning how to surf than with God, is disquieted to learn that her brother Rafael has been living as a monk, and not bumming around Australia as she has believed. As Rafael wrestles with his faith, Ines tries to establish a connection.

      Select Festivals:
      Toronto International Film Festival, São Paulo International Film Festival, João Pedro Rodrigues Retrospective

    • Bas-Fonds

      Bas-Fonds

      dir. Isild le Besco

      On the outskirts of civilization, three young women, Magalie, Marie-Steph and Barbara live a desperate life together. Drowning in alcohol, they both lust for and hate one another, coupling like animals. Yet gradually they become enmeshed in a complex game of love and domination.

      Select Festivals:
      Locarno International Film Festival (Nominated for Golden Leopard), Oldenburg Film Festival (Nominated for German Independence Audience Award), Film Comments Selects (Opening Night Film)

    • OK, Enough, Goodbye

      OK, Enough, Goodbye

      dir. Rania Attieh and Daniel Garcia

      In the small, tightly knit city of Tripoli, Lebanon, where family bonds run very deep, a forty-year-old man still lives with his elderly mother and has given up on the idea of becoming independent. But when one day his mother suddenly leaves him, the man is left with nothing but the company of the small city and what it offers.

      Select Festivals:
      Abu Dhabi Film Festival (Best New Director from the Arab World), Philadelphia Film Festival (Special Jury Prize for Narrative Feature), BAFICI (Cinema of the Future Award), Vancouver International Film Festival, Hamptons Film Festival, Thessaloniki Film Festival

    • Exit Elena

      Exit Elena

      dir. Nathan Silver

      With no place to call home, 19-year-old Elena takes a job as a live-in aide. She finds herself thrust into the middle of a family in crisis: all the things that go on between a father, grandmother, mother, and cat. Eventually, Elena strikes something of a balance though... That is, until the prodigal son returns home. Placing fictional characters alongside real people, Exit Elena is shot through with all the rough edges inherent to family life and home movie form – in short, it’s a dark comedy.

      Select Festivals:
      Edinburgh International Film Festival, Viennale, BAFICI, IndieLisboa, IFFBoston, Cucalorus, Vancouver International Film Festival, Woodstock Film Festival (Received Honorable Mention)

    • The Invader

      The Invader

      dir. Nicolas Provost

      An illegal African worker in Belgium, Amadou works in construction for an underworld boss in order to support himself and his sick friend. But when his friend suddenly "disappears," Amadou strikes out on his own. By chance, he spies on a conversation between his boss and Agnes, an attractive businesswoman. Agnes seems to have everything Amadou's looking for: beauty, style, wealth, and connections. He follows her about the city, eventually manufacturing a pretense to strike up a conversation. Agnes is not adverse to this charismatic stranger's advances, but she wants no more than a quick fling. As their romance grows cold, Amadou begins a dangerous descent into violence and madness.

      Select Festivals:
      Venice International Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Hamburg Film Festival, AFI Film Festival, Ghent Film Festival (Best Actor), Seattle Film Festival (Grand Jury Prize for Best New Director); Flemish Film Awards: Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Music, Best Costume Design, Film Industry Award

    • North From Calabria

      North From Calabria

      dir. Marcin Sauter

      North From Calabria is about an idyll, where life is easy and people know each other, tolerate their faults, like to meet to talk and just be together. For one summer, a film crew mingles with the inhabitants of the small Polish town of Chełmsko Slaskie to an enact an "almost" Italian comedy. It turns out all the locals needed was a few lessons on Italian cuisine and a reminder of the art of carpe diem to transform their rural Eastern Europe village into a stand-in for Southern Italy. A documentarian's midsummer night's dream.

      Select Festivals:
      Kraków Film Festival, Zamość Poland Summer Film Festival (Best Documentary Film), True/False Film Festival, Thessaloniki Film Festival

    • A Lake

      A Lake

      dir. Philippe Grandrieux

      An unknown place, a land of snow and of forests, far in the North. A single family lives isolated in a house next to a lake. Alexi, the son, is a young man with a pure heart, a wood cutter. Beset by epileptic fits and and an ecstatic nature, he is one with the nature that surrounds him. With his sister, their blind mother, their father and their youngest brother, the family observes in silence an intense love. And then a stranger arrives, a pained young man who is older than Alexi...

      Select Festivals:
      Venice International Film Festival (Special Mention for Pioneering New Cinematic Trends), Mar del Plata Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival, Gent International Film Festival, AFI Film Festival

      "Confirms Grandrieux as a true original, up there somewhere the filmmakers like Bela Tarr." - Derek Elley, Variety

      "Astonishing, almost unbearably passionate." - Conall Cash, Screener

    • The Fire

      The Fire

      dir. Brigitte Maria Bertele

      After an evening out, the 35-year-old, self-confident Judith is raped on her way home. She fights with all possible means to prevent her life being changed. Her lawyer advises her to press charges. But destructive consequences force their way into her life. When the perpetrator's false statement causes her hopes of legal redress to collapse, Judith looks for another way to get justice and it almost looks like she is out for revenge. But Judith is pursuing an unusual, radical path to prove the criminal's guilt.

      Select Festivals:
      Max Ophüls Festival, Montréal World Film Festival (Best Director), Oldenburg International Film Festival (Best Actress), Thessaloniki International Film Festival, Paris German Film Festival

      "Bertele's competent direction... is distinguished mainly by its cool restraint, counterpointing the paranoia and rage of the film's increasingly obsessed heroine whose quest for justice transforms into a thirst for revenge." - Ronnie Scheib, Variety

      "Viewers will likely feel just as helpless and uneasy as [the heroine's] achingly supportive boyfriend does." - Laura Kern, Film Comment

    • Extraordinary Stories

      Extraordinary Stories

      dir. Mariano Llinás

      "X" witnesses a murder in the countryside and flees, fearing for his life, but soon realizes he doesn't know who he is running from. "Z" finds his new job immeasurably dull, yet is soon compelled to investigate the life of his predecessor, discovering a web of secret identities, illicit funds, and nefarious trade. "H" is contracted to navigate a river photographing stone monoliths, seemingly the easiest money he will ever make, until he comes face to face with a man hired to destroy them. These three stories form the basis for the circuitous narrative that takes us around the globe, through the lives of farmers, bureaucrats, jailers, architects, and more, and gamely explores the mammoth question of "where is the truth in any story?"

      Select Festivals:
      Buenos Aires Film Festival (Special Jury Prize, Audience Award), Turin Film Festival, Cinequest Film Festival, Miami International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, Vancouver International Film Festival

      "At once instantly accessible and like nothing I've ever seen before." - Paul Brunick, The New York Times

      "A source of... exquisite pleasures." - Andrew Schenker, Slant Magazine

    • A Fallible Girl

      A Fallible Girl

      dir. Conrad Clark

      Lifei, a Chinese woman in Dubai, struggles to gain financial independence through a small mushroom farm in the middle of the desert. A layered and atypical portrait of an increasingly globalized world, the film was shot on location in Dubai, features two Chinese leads, a British director, and dialogue in a mixture of Arabic, Mandarin, and English.

      Select Festivals:
      International Film Festival Rotterdam, Bradford International Film Festival, Gulf film Festival

      "Before the final credits, the feeling that seizes the spectator is one of sadness and melancholia."
      - Cristina Álvarez López, De Film Krant

      “Visually impressive... purifying.”
      - 2013 International Film Festival Rotterdam

    • Leones

      Leones

      dir. Jazmín López

      Deep in the forest a group of five friends wander around like a lion herd. Lost in their word games, they play and seduce each other while going back and forth into adulthood territory, in a desperate search to avoid their already written story.

      Select Festivals:
      Venice Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, New Directors/New Films, Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Cinema, Thessaloniki International Film Festival

      "[Director Jazmín] López's study of time and spirituality transcends conventional narrative filmmaking to good, if not stellar effect."
      - Patrick Gamble, CineVue

      "Leones is one of the most demanding films of the festival so far because of the attractive mystery it bestows, not wholly confined to an opaque narrative, but referentially bonded with a method of filmmaking that holds considerable implications."
      - Ed Doyle, Sound on Sight

    • To The Wolf

      To The Wolf

      dir. Aran Hughes and Christina Koutsospyrou

      The hybrid narrative/documentary follows an aging population living in a decaying village in the mountains of Greece far from the wonders of Athens, and its struggles due to the economic follies of the country.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlinale, Thessaloniki Documentary Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Docslisboa, Viennale, Torino Film Festival

      "A visionary, crafted gem of nonfiction."
      - Ray Pride, Filmmaker Magazine

      “One of the standouts” at the Toronto International Film Festival.
      - Adam Nayman, Cinema Scope

    • Soft in the Head

      Soft in the Head

      dir. Nathan Silver

      Thrown out of her New York City apartment, Natalia, a 25-year-old hot mess, relies on the kindness of friends and strangers. Seemingly unaware of the havoc she wreaks, she skips from one place to another, including her best friend's, where she crashes a holiday meal and seduces the best friend's socially inept brother. Natalia ends up staying at a shelter run by genuinely good Maury, who takes an interest in making her life better -- but life is not that simple, and tragedy ensues. With a menagerie of New York characters, set against the backdrop of a homeless shelter, a religious household, and the cacophonous streets of New York, SOFT IN THE HEAD is a look at how easy it is to lose one’s head in the big city, particularly for those already lost.

      Select Festivals:
      Sarasota Film Festival, BAFICI, Viennale, Vancouver International Film Festival, Göteborg International Film Festival, Brooklyn Film Festival (Winner: Best Actress), Dallas VideoFest (Winner: Best Narrative Feature

      "Nathan Silver's raucous, disturbing new film is a shrewdly conceived yet emotionally unhinged blend of uproarious situations and devastating outcomes."
      - The New Yorker

      "...the audience must sink or swim. The sensation is at once maddening and, for its daredevil embrace of naturalism, absolutely thrilling."
      - Steve Dollar, The Wall Street Journal

      "John Cassavetes-like slice of lowlife."
      - Peter Keough, Boston Globe

    • The International Sign for Choking

      The International Sign for Choking

      dir. Zach Weintraub

      A would-be expatriate from the US takes his second stab at life in Buenos Aires. Watch as he drifts between halfhearted attempts at work, a feeble romance with his fellow North American housemate, and the fruitless search for a mysteriously absent ex-girlfriend.

      Select Festivals:
      BAFICI, IndieLisboa, BAMcinemaFest, Maryland Film Festival, AFI Fest, SF IndieFest, Torino Film Festival

      "Weintraub has made something of a hipster Ozu film out of his fleecy material, and as with Ozu, the theme of loss is paramount.”
      - Robert Kohler, Variety

      “An experience in alternative narrative filmmaking, with incredible emotional depth that goes nearly unnoticed until the final moments.”
      - Kathryn Schroeder, Film Fracture

      "The film upends expectations at every turn, from the defiantly nontouristic views of Buenos Aires to the tough, unsparing conclusions the story reaches about its adrift protagonist.”
      - Keith Uhlich, Time Out New York

    • The Temptation of St. Tony

      The Temptation of St. Tony

      dir. Veiko Õunpuu

      Tony, a middle-aged, midlevel manager, leads a quiet life. But one day, he starts to question the value of being good. In a series of bizarre encounters, Tony gradually becomes unhinged from reality.

      Select Festivals:
      Sundance Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, BAMcinématek, Hong Kong International Film Festival, Karlovy Vary Film Festival, London Film Festival, Tokyo International Film Festival

      "[Director] Veiko Õunpuu has weaved an existential rumination on Eastern European temporality, where work is waiting and waiting is work, and a visually stunning critique of the exacerbation of difference that post-communist times have to offer."
      - Diego Costa, Slant Magazine

      "The black-and-silver photography is like fine-edged engraving; Õunpuu is one of the few directors featured who seems to take making a film as an "Astonish me" challenge."
      - Nick Pinketon, Village Voice

      "Bizarre and beautiful, disturbing and droll."
      - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

    • Nothing Personal

      Nothing Personal

      dir. Urszula Antoniak

      A young travelling woman and a older educated, solitary man close a deal: food in exchange of work. But there is one condition: no personal contact, no questions. Who will be the first one to break the deal?

      Select Festivals:
      Locarno Film Festival, Warsaw Film Festival, Thessaloniki International Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Dublin Film Festival, Miami Film Festival

      "We've forgotten the power of measured and calculated quiet, or how unsettling its presence can be, a sensation [director Urszula] Antoniak understands and exploits."
      - Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times

      "The cinematographer... envelops [the characters] in a world of extraordinary sensuality." (Critics' Pick)
      - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

      “The whole thing is a pleasure to watch... because [Lotte] Verbeek and [Stephen] Rea telegraph volumes of subtext beneath the dialogue they’re given.”
      - Ernest Hardy, Village Voice

    • Himizu

      Himizu

      dir. Sion Sono

      Following the Japanese earthquake and tsunami, a 15-year-old boy abandoned by his family desires normalcy but is driven to violence. Meanwhile, a classmate openly obsessed with him makes it her mission to bring him back to the righteous path. Is it possible for either of them to find hope in an increasingly bleak world?

      Select Festivals:
      Venice Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Pusan International Film Festival, Oslo International Film Festival, Deauville Asian Film Festival

      "[Director Sion Sono] has captured not only staggering images that exemplify our tumbledown world but what may become one of the great themes of our time: how the young will bear the yoke of elders who've been wiped out... by recent events."
      - Mike McCahill, The Guardian

      "Young leads Shota Sometani and Fumi Nikaidou – both experienced film actors – grow in stature as the film progresses to the achingly real final scene."
      - Deborah Young, Hollywood Reporter

      "Himizu finds a... hard-won feeling of hope."
      - Kenji Fujishima, Slant Magazine

    • Me Too

      Me Too

      dir. Antonio Naharro and Álvaro Pastor

      Daniel meets Laura. She’s attractive, rebellious, and a little trampy. They hang out, have fun together, and he falls hard for her. The unexpected part is that 34-year-old Daniel has Down syndrome. While Daniel is definitely extraordinary—a college graduate who holds sophisticated conversations—he still has to deal with others’ perceptions of him. As Daniel and Laura grow closer, their emotions take them into unfamiliar territory.

      Select Festivals:
      Sundance Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Seattle International Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Vancouver International Film Festival

      "Sensitive without being unrealistically utopian (this isn’t a fairy tale), “Me, Too” movingly represents the frustration of the high-functioning yet falling-short individual."
      - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

      "[Directors Álvaro] Pastor and [Antonio] Naharro have written a great part for [Lola] Dueñas and direct her with great care. In fact, her delicately nuanced portrayal is crucial to why this lovely film works so well. "
      - Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times

      "The film powerfully hits the note of universalism that is its goal."
      - Ernest Hardy, Village Voice

    • Starfish Hotel

      Starfish Hotel

      dir. John Williams

      Strange things always happen in Jo Kuroda's mystery novels. There is always a sinister rabbit called Mr Trickster; and someone always ends up dead. A man's wife disappears and he finds her working in a brothel deep in the heart of the city. There is a universe called the Darkland that can only be entered through a hidden tunnel. There is a young girl that the man had an affair with in the dead of winter, two years ago. She would only meet him in the eerie, crumbling Starfish Hotel. Now she's disappeared too. If you meet Jo Kuroda one night, don't tell him your dreams.

      Select Festivals:
      Seattle International Film Festival, Sydney Film Festival, Luxembourg International Film Festival, Brussels International Festival of Fantastic Film

      "...more than the sum of its mysterioso atmospherics. Williams is after bigger game, just as “Alice in Wonderland,” one of his inspirations, is not only a tale for children, but also an adult meditation on the strangeness and madness of the world."
      - Mark Schilling, The Japan Times

      "Its visuals are rich and static, its soundtrack a decadent pleasure bordering on discordant, and like all good allegories, the picture it paints has meaning beyond the images used to depict it."
      - Deni, Heroic Cinema

    • Late Bloomers

      Late Bloomers

      dir. Julie Gavras

      In this romantic comedy, Mary and Adam aren’t your typical older couple, they’re high functioning and stylish and to their great surprise, they’ve entered the senior category. Adam is in frantic denial, desperately looking for the fountain of youth as Mary decides to deal with the situation by doing what she does best, taking care of her husband and family. After 30 years together, the married couple confronts the unpalatable realities of getting older and concludes that emotional absence is the easiest way to cope.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin International Film Festival, Calgary International Film Festival, Brussels Film Festival, Cabourg Film Festival

      "Without even trying to be profound, the film communicates a great deal of truth."
      - Roger Ebert, RoberEbert.com

      "It’s a pleasure to see Hurt and Rossellini work together and apart as a couple who still have a spark."
      - Alison Willmore, AV Club

    • Yumurta

      Yumurta

      dir. Semih Kaplanoglu

      A poet, Yusuf, after learning of his mother's death, returns to his childhood hometown, which he hasn't visited for years. A young girl, Ayla awaits him in a crumbling house. Yusuf has been unaware of the existence of this distant relation who had been living with his mother for five years. She informs him, despite his desire to return to Istanbul, he must perform a sacrifice his mother has been prevented by death from fulfilling.

      Select Festivals:
      Cannes Film Festival, Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, Thessaoloniki International Film Festival, Trieste Film Festival, Milano Film Festival

      "[The protagonist Yusuf is on] a journey that, captured with compassion, humaneness, and melancholy by [director Semih] Kaplanoglu and company's frequently ravishing, deliberately paced view of it, is a thing of compassionate, melancholy beauty."
      - Christopher McQuain, DVD Talk

      "This film is a wonderful, sensitive, realistic and poetic return to one's past."
      - Mavi Boncuk Turkish Cinema Newsletter

    • Süt

      Süt

      dir. Semih Kaplanoglu

      Recent high school graduate Yusuf is uncertain about his future in the provincial countryside. Writing poetry is his greatest passion and some of his poems are starting to be published in obscure literary journals. But for the time being, he continues working in his single mother's village milk business, also with an uncertain future. Can he survive on poetry and working alongside his mother in her small-time milk business? Or will he be forced to move to the big city or seek a job in one of the many factories threatening the unspoiled landscape?

      Select Festivals:
      Venice Film Festival, Istanbul International Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival, London Turkish Film Festival

      "[Director Semih] Kaplanoglu’s cinema is just that—beads of intriguing shots and sequences that could make an interesting necklace only if the viewer chooses to string them together."
      - Jugu Abraham, Movies Sans Frontieres

      "Süt is ultimately a sensitive, visually gorgeous (as usual for Kaplanoglu) delve into the troubled dreams and dissatisfying yet wide-open, unpredictable reality of our ever-conflicted protagonist's post-teen transitional limbo, the shaky bridge between his relatively uncomplicated childhood and his free, successful, but alienated adulthood."
      - Christopher McQuain, DVD Talk

    • Bal

      Bal

      dir. Semih Kaplanoglu

      Yusuf's best friend is his father, who supports his family's modest life with the honey he collects from tall trees in the forests of the remote Turkish countryside. Yusuf is a quiet boy, and his mother is concerned for his future. Perhaps he will follow in his father's footsteps, or perhaps school will offer him other opportunities.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin International Film Festival, Sydney Film Festival, Karlovy Vary Film Festival, Melbourne International Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival

      "Like the viewer, Mr. Kaplanoglu is quite happy to let nature do the talking and cast a lyrical, mysterious spell."
      - Andy Webster, The New York Times

      "Bal mingles the bitter and the sweet."
      - Sam Adams, AV Club

    • Summer Pasture

      Summer Pasture

      dir. Lynn True, Nelson Walker, and Tsering Perlo

      The story of a family at a crossroads, Summer Pasture takes place at a critical time in Locho and Yama's lives, as they question their future as nomads. With their pastoral traditions confronting rapid modernization, Locho and Yama must reconcile the challenges that threaten to drastically reshape their existence.

      Select Festivals:
      Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Tokyo International Film Festival, Museum of Modern Art, IDA DocuWeeks, Big Sky Documentary Film Festival

      "Summer Pasture is remarkable not merely for documenting the disappearing way of life, but for registering the depth of Yama and Locho's uncertainty about moving on from it."
      - Benjamin Mercer, Village Voice

      "Has an earthy intimacy and compassion for its subjects that will have you thinking about their plight long after they've packed up and moved on for winter."
      - Robert Abele, Los Angeles Times

      "So while the film has the plaintive spirit of a humanitarian portrait, directors Lynn True, Nelson Walker, and Tsering Perlo have more valuably developed a time capsule of rural Asian idiosyncrasy."
      - Joseph Jon Lanthier, Slant Magazine

    • Sado Tempest

      Sado Tempest

      dir. John Williams

      Sado Tempest is a radical retelling of Shakespeare's 'Tempest', fusing Noh theatre, Taiko drumming and Japanese rock. Japan, the near future; rebel rock star, Jun Tokushima is exiled to the bleak prison island of Sado, which has fallen into permanent winter after a terrible storm. At first he tries to escape, but there is no way off the island. His only hope seems to lie in the strange, ancient songs of the Demons that once lived there, but the Demons have all disappeared. Jun has to break the code of the songs, and free the Demons, in order to bring Spring back into the world.

      Select Festivals:
      Raindance International Film Festival, Brooklyn Film Festival, Camera Japan Festival, Montreal Festival du Nouveau Cinema

      "...a fantastic voyage beyond cultures and eras to strange islands in the subconscious we seldom visit save in dreams."
      - Mark Schilling, The Japan Times

      "A fascinating example of hybrid filmmaking, Sado Tempest is at once the product of wildly diverse roots and a homogenously original creation."
      - Tom Mes, Midnight Eye

    • Die Welt

      Die Welt

      dir. Alex Pitstra

      We follow Abdallah, a young DVD salesman from Tunis, who dreams of a better life in Europe, or in Die Welt, as his father calls the other side of the Mediterranean. The film is based on Pitstra’s own observations in Tunisia, his father’s country, which was unfamiliar to him for the first 25 years of his life. With fresh cinematic audacity and convincing performances, including a role played by his own father, Pitstra paints an immersive picture of daily life in post-revolutionary Tunisia.

      Select Festivals:
      International Film Festival Rotterdam, New Directors/New Films, Seattle International Film Festival, Edinburgy International Film Festival, Doha Tribeca Film Festival

      "Alex Pitstra intermingles documentary and fiction as impressively as he does the seemingly incongruous worlds of Tunisia and Holland that form his identity."
      - Kevin Lee, IndieWire

      "Die Welt is a lively and intelligent exploration of the conflicted emotions felt by contemporary Arab youth towards the West."
      - Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter

    • When We Leave

      When We Leave

      dir. Feo Aladag

      German-born Umay flees her oppressive marriage in Istanbul, taking her young son Cem with her. She hopes to find a better life with her family in Berlin, but her unexpected arrival creates intense conflict. Her family is trapped in their conventions, torn between their love for her and the traditional values of their community.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin International Film Festival, Istanbul Film Festival, Tribeca Film Festival, Seattle International Film Festival, Moscow Film Festival, Venice Film Festival

      "[Sibel] Kekilli...makes for a magnetic focal point, and the story of Umay’s rebellion builds toward an almost unbearable tension."
      - Andrew O'Hehir, Salon

      "When We Leave is a film without villains. Instead, it features a set of circumstances that inevitably and needlessly spin out of control. B-Plus."
      - Scott Tobias, AV Club

    • Letters to Father Jacob

      Letters to Father Jacob

      dir. Klaush Härö

      With few options, newly pardoned convict Leila agrees to work as an assistant to a blind pastor. Father Jacob spends his days answering the letters of the needy, which Leila finds pointless. But when the letters stop, the pastor is devastated and Leila finds herself cast in a new role.

      Select Festivals:
      Gothenburg Film Festival, Vancouver International Film Festival, Pusan International Film Festival, Santa Barbara International Film Festival, Seattle International Film Festival

      "Letters to Father Jacob serves as a stirring example of just what can be accomplished in a mere 74 minutes."
      - Michael Rechtshaffen, The Hollywood Reporter

      "Both leads provide remarkable, exquisitely calibrated performances."
      - Alissa Simon, Variety

    • R

      R

      dir. Tobias Lindholm and Michael Noer

      The prisoner R arrives to Denmark’s toughest prison, where he is to serve a sentence for violent assault. R is reduced to a number, a letter, just another inmate. The prison is a parallel world filled with rules, honor, and debts. A world, in which bars cover the windows and blood stains the floor. R is placed in the most hardcore ward. Here he must find his place in the system, learn to navigate, and fight for survival. navigate, and fight for survival.

      Select Festivals:
      International Film Festival Rotterdam, Gothenburg International Film Festival, BAM Cinematek, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, Montreal World Film Festival

      "There's a palpable desperation to each sequence, and Noer and Lindholm's fluid handheld camera haunts these men through the dank interiors and gloomy prison yard, sometimes holding on them for long takes that seem to capture an entire experience in a matter of minutes."
      - Glenn Heath, Jr, Slant Magazine

      "Directors-screenwriters Lindholm and Noer are careful not to let the audience know more than their protagonist does, keeping them in the nerve-wrecking state of uncertainty and fear."
      - Karsten Kastelan, Hollywood Reporter

    • Ocaso

      Ocaso

      dir. Théo Court

      Rafael, an old butler of a decadent farmhouse, lives with his landlord in that space. He develops a series of actions and daily routines that resume a life and a glorious family past. These actions and gestures will become the only way of sustaining that home and those lives humbled in memory. With the decline of that environment, Rafael will be underdog of his place and his own story, and will be forced to leave in an uncertain trip, towards the last of his possessions.

      Select Festivals:
      International Film Festival Rotterdam, BAFICI, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria International Film Festival, Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival

      "The gradual fade-out of an old man’s existence — and a way of life — unfolds with exquisite beauty..."
      - Robert Koehler, Variety

    • Days of Gray

      Days of Gray

      dir. Ani Simon-Kennedy

      It is a world without language. A world where one is raised to respect the rules. Every possession is strictly utilitarian. All must wear masks when venturing from home. Men must protect society from outsiders who do not follow the rules. Faith is dead. Hope is dead. Joy is dead. Only one boy questions the verity of what he has been taught. He scavenges for lost objects from distant times, he shares warmth with his younger Sister, and he dares to befriend an outsider - the Girl. The Boy knows it is only a matter of time before he must become a hunter like his father, eliminating outsiders. He must decide whether to continue living in a society of fear or choose his own destiny.

      Select Festivals:
      Reykjavík International Film Festival, Göteberg International Film Festival, Two Riversides Art + Film Festival, Kaunas International Film Festival, Nordic Film Festival, New Filmmakers New York

      "While its fable-like simplicity makes it a specialty item in commercial terms, it represents an assured debut that should attract attention on the fest circuit and could connect with musical tastemakers."
      - John Defore, The Hollywood Reporter

      "The film concerns the rituals and tensions of one particular homestead... It all feels universal, and crucially, exportable."
      - Mark Asch, Keyframe

    • Buoy

      Buoy

      dir. Steve Doughton

      A married mother of two, unexpectedly pregnant with her third child, answers the phone to hear a voice from her distant past. Against the backdrop of various subjects - his narrow escape from a sinking fishing vessel, her deep loneliness as a parent, their shared and complicated history - the 80-minute conversation reveals the deeper stories of their selves, at the same time it explores universal questions: What does it mean to be a good person and to live your life well? How do you keep your disappointment in—and envy for—another person's life choices from standing in the way of your love for her or him? Is it possible to forgive betrayals of the past as you commit one in the present?

      Select Festivals:
      Queensworld Film Festival (Winner of Best Actor - Female - Feature), BendFilm Festival (Winner of Best Screenplay Award), Northwest Filmmakers' Festival (Winner of Audience Favorite Narrative Feature Award), Lone Star Film Festival, Ashland Independent Film Festival

      "A bold but never showy bit of innovative filmmaking"
      - Marc Mohan, The Oregonian

      "Unexpectedly compelling... [Steve Doughton]'s understated formalism nicely balances roller-coaster emotions."
      - Tom Keogh, Seattle Times

    • My Brother the Devil

      My Brother the Devil

      dir. Sally El Hosaini

      Mo is a young boy growing up in a traditional Egyptian household, but beyond the front door of the family's modest London flat is a completely different world - the streets of Hackney. The impressionable Mo idolizes his handsome older brother Rashid and wants to follow is his footsteps. However, Rashid, a charismatic and shrewd member of a local gang, wants a different life for his little brother and deals drugs hoping to put Mo through college. One eventful summer, Rashid's sexual awakening forces Mo to confront his own fears and phobias and threatens to tear the brothers apart.

      Select Festivals:
      Sundance Film Festival, Berlin International Film Festival, Rio de Janeiro International Film Festival, Warsaw Film Festival, Stockholm International Film Festival

      "A film that so artfully refuses to surrender to convention."
      - John Anderson, Variety

      "My Brother the Devil... is a tender, bracing fraternal drama of London's gang life, the immigrant experience, and questions no smaller than what 'manhood' might mean."
      - Alan Scherstuhl, Village Voice

    • Ivan & Ivana

      Ivan & Ivana

      dir. Jeff Daniel Silva

      After the Kosovo war devastates a young couple's homeland and their dreams for a normal life, they set out unexpectedly from the Balkans, along a wild journey to rebuild their lives anew in America. Arriving in California amidst the peak of a housing boom that would soon burst, the film reveals their trials and tribulations over five years of turbulent economic, political and personal tides to reveal an unorthodox depiction of the American immigrant experience.

      Select Festivals:
      Visions du Reel, Independent Film Festival Boston, Viennale, Documentary Fortnight at Museum of Modern Art, Human Rights Arts & Film Festival

      "The titular subjects display an amazing openness toward helmer Jeff Silva and toward the camera as witness, granting viewers an unfiltered look at the U.S. economic meltdown...Silva's docu warrants limited theatrical release."
      - Ronnie Scheib, Variety

      "‎Silva skillfully conveys seismic shifts in Ivan and Ivana's relationship through the subtlest of touches."
      - Victoria Large, Not Coming to a Theater Near You

    • Tiger Tail in Blue

      Tiger Tail in Blue

      dir. Frank V. Ross

      Tiger Tail in Blue is about a young married couple, Christopher & Melody, that work opposite schedules to remain financially afloat as Chris bangs out his first novel while working nights as a waiter. Never seeing each other is taking its toll, as the two rarely get a chance to engage one another. Chris finds the attention he craves in the past and Brandy, a saucy co-worker.

      Select Festivals:
      Cork International Film Festival, Melbourne International Film Festival, Rooftop Films Screening Series, Wisconsin Film Festival, Reynolda Film Festival, Best Film Not Playing at a Theater Near You MOMA Screening Series

      "Some moviegoers still cherish the chance to experience the work of new and intriguing voices who don't follow the established rules of commercial cinema. For those hardy people, "Tiger Tail in Blue" is worth seeking out."
      - Peter Sobczynski, RogerEbert.com

      "The film is a measured look at working class married life that dares to remain true to life’s actual, mundane reality. It is within that formal commitment that we find truth and revelation; the question of what we do with that knowledge is left for us to answer."
      - Mike S. Ryan, Hammer to Nail

    • You Make Me Feel So Young

      You Make Me Feel So Young

      dir. Zach Weintraub

      A black and white movie about grey areas. Justine moves to a small town with her boyfriend on account of his new job. Quick kisses and repetitive manual tasks ensue.

      Select Festivals:
      Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Cinema, New Orleans Film Festival, Olympia Film Festival

      "a stark and elliptical portrait of an ailing relationship between a young couple, that succeeds in turning microscopic shifts in behaviour into something of great cumulative power."
      - Ian Barr, The Brag

      "Everyday concerns are both the parts and the whole. The fleeting beauty and frequent boredom of small town, small time life are the plot points."
      - Brandon Harris, The New Inquiry

    • The Destiny of Lesser Animals

      The Destiny of Lesser Animals

      dir. Deron Albright

      A dream deferred... a future never dreamed of. The Destiny of Lesser Animals follows Boniface Koomsin, a Ghanaian police inspector, as he embarks upon a dangerous crime-laden journey to recover the one thing that can help him realize his ultimate dream— to escape the ghosts of his past and return to America.

      Select Festivals:
      Chicago International Film Festival, Starz Denver Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, New Directors New Films, Seattle International Film Festival, Philadelphia Film Festival

      "Albright’s keen direction, along with Nunoo’s impressive acting, make for a compelling drama."
      - Clinton Stark, The Stark Insider

      "A ‎Ghanaian crime thriller that goes beyond the genre to become a work of art."
      - Eric Shlapack, Examiner.com

    • Boy Eating the Bird's Food

      Boy Eating the Bird's Food

      dir. Ektoras Lygizos

      Following his will to survive while retaining his dignity and keeping his canary alive, the whole time fighting his hunger, 23-year-old Yorgos wanders the streets of Athens. The camera will follow him closely, sensing his power, his despair, his pride, and his essence, but without attempting to explain his actions, his motives or his situation. Besides, there’s no need to. Through its pared down, ascetic style, the film reveals the deepest facets of the hero’s existence, and, along with it, a painfully accurate picture of modern-day Greece, in a heart-rending yet inspiring film, that cannot help but strike a chord in us all.

      Select Festivals:
      Toronto International Film Festival, Reykjavik International Film Festival, BFI London Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival

      "...a cinematic cri de coeur from a nation in physically and psychologically dire straits."
      - Boyd van Hoeij, Variety

      "The spectre of the current Greek economic crisis looms large in this astonishing first feature that sees realism and allegory sit side-by-side."
      - Laurence Boyce, Cineuropa

    • The Girl

      The Girl

      dir. Fredrik Edfeldt

      In the summer of 1981, a 9-year old girl is left behind in her aunt’s care while the rest of her family goes to Africa as aid workers. The aunt is soon courted by a man and leaves the girl with the promise to return in a few days. The abandoned girl keeps this a secret from everyone and uses her freedom to discover the world around her as the summer passes by. With sharpening senses she gradually discovers the often absurd and careless world of adults.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin Film Festival, Athens International Film Festival, Helsinki International Film Festival, Montreal Festival du Nouveau Cinema

      "...delivers a satisfying, sun-dappled fable about the kindness of strangers and the cruelty of peers."
      - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

      "Fredrik Edfeldt is a master at externalizing interiority without spoiling it. His camera is unabashed yet respectful of the delicateness of its subject."
      - Diego Costa, Slant

    • Oxygen

      Oxygen

      dir. Hans Van Nuffel

      Suffering from an illness that is slowly destroying his lungs, Tom struggles with his short life expectancy and hangs out with petty criminals. Enter his hospital neighbour Xavier who suffers from the same illness but behaves like an athlete and infuses Tom with optimism. Tom enjoys his new friend and finds love with quirky quarantine girl Eline. But when Tom’s brother dies during a lung transplant, he is devastated and breaks away from Xavier and Eline. Much later, Tom and Xavier meet again when they are both up for a lung transplant. Slowly, their friendship rekindles...

      Select Festivals:
      Rome International Film Festival, Festival des Films du Monde Montréal, Seville European Film Festival, Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival

      "Underplaying the expected tears and inspirational uplift, Oxygène skirts disease-of-the-week cliche to deliver a touching portrait of youth facing mortality far too soon."
      - Dennis Harvey, Variety

      "...an impressively made tale about two young men trying to embrace life despite illness dragging them down. It is touching, harrowing and even gently romantic at times..."
      - Mark Adams, Screen Daily

    • The Hunter

      The Hunter

      dir. Rafi Pitts

      In an act of vengeance, a young man, randomly kills two police officers. He escapes to the forest, where he is arrested by two other officers. The three men are surrounded by trees, the woods. They are lost in a maze, a desolate landscape, where the boundaries between the hunter and the hunted are difficult to perceive.

      Select Festivals:
      Berlin Film Festival, Seattle International Film Festival, Palm Springs Film Festival, Iranian Film Festival Australia

      "...Manages an atmosphere of choked, ambiguous dread, somehow naturalistic and hallucinatory at once, that recalls nothing less than Godard's Alphaville."
      - Chuck Bowen, Slant

      "...Seeps under your skin as you wait for its grim, taciturn protagonist to detonate."
      - Stephen Holden, Screen Daily

    • Good to Go

      Good to Go

      dir. Matevz Luzar

      Ivan is a retired music teacher in his late 70s, and has grown weary of life. He buys himself a plot in a graveyard with an unrivalled view of the Alps and checks into a retirement home, so he can wait for his death in peace. However, the exact opposite happens: at computer classes, he discovers his joie-de-vivre and finally starts to live.

      Select Festivals:
      Slovenian Film Festival, Pula International Film Festival, LET’S CEE Film Festival, Prishtina International Film Festival, Mumbai Film Festival

      "Good to Go is an uncommon and intensely successful debut film..."
      - Ronny Dombrowski, Cinetastic

      "A bittersweet monument..."
      - Gorazd Trušnovec, Ekran

    • Crawl

      Crawl

      dir. Hervé Lasgouttes

      Crawl tells the emerging romance between Martin, a Young man living on casual jobs and small robberies, and Gwen a dedicated swimmer who trains everyday in high-sea. Their lives changed when she gets pregnant and he is charged with murder.

      Select Festivals:
      Venice Days, International Film Festival Bratislava, Panorama of European Cinema, Palm Springs International Film Festival, Göteborg International Film Festival, Rendez-vous du cinéma français

      "Debuting director Hervé Lasgouttes uses the chilly setting to potent effect, and his eye for local detail and compassion for his characters ground the film ..."
      - Sheri Linden, Hollywood Reporter

      "Director Hervé Lasgouttes exhibits a real talent for achieving the look, sound and feel of a particular environment and the type of community that inhabits it."
      - Laura Clifford, Reeling Reviews

    • Myn Bala

      Myn Bala

      dir. Akan Satayev

      In 1729 Kazakhstan, a ferocious Mongol tribe sweeps across the Steppes. A young man named Sartai assembles a detachment of young warriors and leads them into battle to free his country from decades of terror.

      Select Festivals:
      Cannes Film Festival, Doha Tribeca Film Festival, Montreal Film Festival, Eurasia International Film Festival

      "...Set to do for Kazakhstan what Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon did for China: take its films out of the arthouse and into the mainstream."
      - Nick Roddick, The London Evening Standard

      "Kazakhstan’s official entry in the best foreign-language Oscar race is a sabre-rattling, chest-beating, flag-waving celebration of a mythic warrior hero from the early 18th century."
      - Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter